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KID GALAHAD - Trivia


 

  • Kid Galahad opened nationally on August 29, 1962. In many areas, the cofeature was The Nun and The Sergeant, a film set in the Korean War and starring Robert Webber and Anna Sten.

 

  • Kid Galahad originated as a story in the Saturday Evening Post in the 1930s. The story was first filmed in 1937 by Warner Bros. Stars included Edward G. Robinson, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, and Wayne Morris. During World War II, Morris (who played the same role that Elvis would later play) was one of the most decorated of the U.S. combat pilots. He shot down seven Japanese aircraft and sank two destroyers. Morris was awarded four Distinguished Flying Crosses. In the 1960s, the title of the film was changed to The Battling Bellhop so as not to be confused with Elvis's version. Warner Bros. remake Kid Galahad in 1941 as The Wagons Roll at Night, this time in a circus setting. Humphrey Bogart, Sylvia Sidney, and Eddie Albert starred.

 

  • Much of Kid Galahad was filmed in Idyllwild, California, a popular resort ninety miles east of Los Angeles. Filming began in November 1961, and was completed on December 21. Interiors were shot on MGM/UA's Culver City lot. The shooting on location, the beautiful Idyllwild mountains, stook 6,300 feet above the sea level. While trying to find the place, Elvis and his entourage got lost three times. And even though the storyline happens during springtime/summer, as shooting began in November, it was cold and everyone was uncomfortable with that.

 

  • Before Elvis started shooting, he drove by a building and went inside. A midle-aged lady recognized him and the book she was holding fell to the ground. She took him through the hallway and led him into the classroom. "Hey, everyone," she said, "we have an unexpected visitor." And he came in. First the thirty 10-year-old children remained silent - then started to scream. The teacher calmed the children down and told Elvis, who was holding a hat in his hand, "You know, Elvis, you still need a hair cut?" Elvis laughed and replied, "It's not that long, is it?" Everybody laughed. Then Elvis turned to Mrs. Grimes and said, "I only wanted to stop by to thank you for all your help." Elvis drove by his old school when he was on his way to Hollywood to start shooting his tenth movie.

 

  • In this movie, Elvis had to play the role of a boxer who doens't have style, but has a very good right hand and an iron chin to make up for that. When the shooting started, Elvis was in very good shape and had lost 16 pounds for his part. He shocked everyone by tipping the scales at a hefty two hundred pounds. To his credit, Elvis went right into heavy training, just like a real boxer. He started running every day, hitting the punching bag, shadowboxing, and even sparring with some hired pro boxers. And he went into a high-protein diet.

 

  • Mushy Callahan, a former world junior welter-weight boxing champion (1926-1930), coached Elvis for his fight scenes. Callahan was assisted by Al Silvani, trainer and cornerman for Floyd Patterson, Jake LaMotta, Rocky Graziano, and Carmen Basilio, among others. Callahan considered Elvis "my best student" and spoke about his ability: "He has the quickest set of hands of all the actors I've worked so far and he throws a very good punch. He's also able of taking a good punch."

 

  • On this movie, Elvis said, "I get better with each movie I make, but only after Follow That Dream did I started to think that all the study and work were paying off. Now I'd like to focus on acting. I'll never stop singing, but there's no reason to not combine both things. Sinatra did it. And Crosby, too."

 

  • Director Phil Karlson began in the movie industry as a prop man at Universal. While directing The Phenix City Story (1955) in Alabama in the mid-1950s, Karlson uncovered evidence that helped convict the murder suspects in the trial, which was still in progress (The Phenix City Story  was a dramatization of that case). Other films directed by Phil Karlson include The Young Doctors (1961), The Silencers (1966), and Walking Tall (1973).

 

  • Jimmy Lennon, fight announcer at the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles, announced two fights in Kid Galahad.

 

  • Orlando de la Fuente, an undefeated 18-year-old welterweight boxer, played Sugarboy Romero in Kid Galahad. It was his film debut.

 

  • The Ruth Batchelor-Sharon Silbert song, Love is for Lovers, was cut from the film. Despite that, several movie reviews in 1962 listed the song as one of those sung in Kid Galahad. Even today, some reference books list Love is for Lovers in the movie's credits.

 

  • Gig Young, who played Willy Grogan, was nominated for an Oscar three times: Come Fill the Cup (1951), Teacher's Pet (1958), and They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). For his role as Rocky, the master ceremonies of the dance marathon in the latter film, he won his only Academy Award. Young (real name: Byron Ellsworth Barr), took his stage name from a character he played in the 1942 movie The Gay Sisters.

 

  • Ed Asner made his film debut in Kid Galahad. Still with hair (!), he played Frank Gerson, an assistant district attorney.

 

  • Charles Bronson (Lew Nyack in Kid Galahad) went from playing Igor in the 3-D film House of Wax (1953) to being one of the highest-paid actors in the world. Bronson (real name: Charles Buchinsky), Clark Gable and Sabu all served as tail gunners in bombers during World War II. During the shoot, Elvis got his nose a little bent out of shape by Charles Bronson, who portrayed Elvis's boxing coach in the movie. As he did on all of his pictures, between takes, Elvis often demonstrated his karate moves for the cast and crew. While the others at least acted impressed, Bronson (who was one of fifteen children of a Lithuanian-born coal miner and a combat veteran of World War II) never joined in the applause and made it very clear that he was unimpressed by Elvis karate exhibitions. But both of them were able to give the impression that the two had a tremendous chemestry on screen.

 

  • Kid Galahad reached #9 on Variety's list of top-grossing films. For the year of 1962, it was ranked #37, grossing $1.75 million.

 

  • Orth Van & Storage - Company on whose truck Walter Gulick rode into Cream Valley. Orth Van &  Storage was affiliated with the Mayflower franchise.

 

  • Cream Valley - Catskills community that was the setting for Kid Galahad. The sign on the outskirts of the community ("Welcome to Cream Valley") listed four businesses: Levine's Loch Lovely, Mintz's Mayfair (formerly Mother Mintz's), Shagri-La Lieberman's (The Lieberman Family Welcomes You), and Grogan's Gaelic Garden ("The Cradle of Champions Since 1937").

 

  • Walter Gulick was born in Cream Valley. Walter was raised by an aunt in Lowbridge, Kentucky, after his parents died when he was fourteen months old.

 

  • While in the Army, Walter was stationed in Okinawa. He worked in the motor pool.

 

  • Prohosko's Repair Shop - Automotive repair business owned by Peter J. Prohosko. After his last fight, Walter was to become an equal partner in the facility.

 

  • $150 - Amount Willy Grogan owed to the company that financed his convertible. Because of his inability to pay the $150, the finance company repossessed his car.

 

  • Walter was paid five dollars a round to spar with Joie Shakes.

 

  • Cream Valley 1732 - Telephone number of Grogan's training camp.

 

  • While cleaning out a barn, Walter discovered an old boxing poster advertising the heavyweight championship fight between Jack Dempsey and Georges Carpentier (July 2, 1921).

 

  • Kid Galahad's first fight was a ten-round bout with Ezzard Bailey at the Capitol Casino in Albany, New York. The purse for the fight was $750. Kid Galahad weighed 180 pounds; Bailey weighed 181 pounds.

 

  • Walter was baptized on August 14, 1939.

 

  • Willy Grogan's publicity on Kid Galahad stated that he had won seventeen straight fights in Australia, which was a fabrication.

 

  • Milton's Meadows - Location of Cream Valley's Independance Day Picnic and Jamboree. Walter and Rose attended the event together.

 

  • Ramón Romero - Boxer fought by Kid Galahad on Labor Day weekend. Romero, nicknamed "Sugarboy", was from Tijuana. He weighed 181 1/2 pounds for the bout; Kid Galahad weighed in at 178 1/2. The Kid knocked out Romero in the third round. (Willy Grogan had bet $1,800 on the Kid).

 

  • Church of St. Stanislaus - Church pastored by Father Higgins at which Walter and Rose were to be married.

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